Drink like a droog | Washington Examiner


debtOr for the sheer volume of words generated, nothing beats Ambrose Heath. A newspaper columnist, Heath wrote (and wrote and wrote and wrote) about groceries. And in a respectable act of recycling, he turned many columns into books.he wrote good food 1932 and more delicious food 1933. good savory, delicious potato dish, delicious soup, nice sweets, delicious canned foodand (why I’m reading Moaning Shelves born of Heath’s Fertile Pen) delicious drink.

I’m not sure how many of the drinks in the Heath compendium can actually be described as ‘good’, but this book answered a question I’ve wondered for years. clockwork orange Writer Anthony Burgess has come up with a bizarre nightclub haunted by the ultra-violent Alex and his horror show gang ‘Droog’, ‘Milkbar’.

The book opens with their flock “making up” at the Korova Milkbar. What, of course, was a milk bar? Something else is a psychoactive substance.

In all the strange nightmares envisioned by Burgess, there is something unsettling about bars selling drugged milk. , I’m worried.

of delicious drink, Heath devotes several chapters to the original phenomenon. “The popularity of milk his bars in recent years has given new meaning to different types of milk beverages,” he wrote. The popularity of milk bars wasn’t just a spontaneous organic craze. Rather, the British milk industry faced a very modern problem: cows in Scotland, England and Wales were producing more milk than the general population was drinking.

This was the mission of the Milk Marketing Board and its constituent dairy companies. Many of them jumped at the idea, which is said to have originated on Fleet Street. The idea is that ‘this cold white liquid’ served ‘in a tall frosted glass’ is a fashionable drink. The first “milk bar” he opened in 1935 and within two years he had over 900. ‘Pub. ‘”

what were they offering? Delicacies such as “Loganberry Delight” made with 7 ounces of milk, 1/2 ounce of loganberry syrup, a dash of orange syrup, a few slices of cucumber, and a “dessert spoon” of crushed loganberries.

Or how about a “cream snowball”? Start with 5 ounces of milk, “1/40 quart of ice cream” (i.e., 1 ounce), “1/2 ounce of creme des mente syrup, and 1 ounce of whipped cream.”

Some of these receipts were provided to Heath by the Milk Marketing Commission. Others “quoted from the booklet with the kind permission of the National Milk Publicity Council. milk recipe

The “Ginger Frappe” is made with eggs, 5 ounces of milk, lemon syrup, ginger syrup, and topped with whipped cream. There is a possibility. But modern Starbucks rarely serve the ‘hot milk drink’ that was so popular in the UK as cold. Think “good shakes.” The recipe goes like this: “1 tablespoon tomato sauce, 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce, a pinch of salt, 7 ounces of hot milk.” daily mail 1935 National Milkshake Competition. I shudder to think what the first prize winner was made of.

Eric Felten is a James Beard Award-winning author. Would you like a drink?

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